Property:Notes

From MurnPost

Jump to: navigation, search

This is a property of type Text.


(previous 25) (next 25)

Pages using the property "Notes"

Showing 19 pages using this property.

S

Soft Sustainability +Same as Context-Free Sustainability (McElroy, 2008).
Stakeholder +A stakeholder in an organization is anyone A stakeholder in an organization is anyone whose vital capitals – and whose interests and well-being, therefore – are affected by the organization’s actions, or whose vital capitals ought to be so affected by virtue of the relationship that exists between them (based on Freeman et al, 2010, and McElroy and van Engelen, 2011). 2010, and McElroy and van Engelen, 2011).
Strong Sustainability +An orientation to sustainability performance that regards impacts on unlike forms of vital capitals as not being substitutable for, or interchangeable with, one another.
Subcontractor/sub-supplier +A business entity in the supply chain which, directly or indirectly, provides the supplier with goods and/or services integral to, and utilized in/for, the production of the supplier's and/or company's goods and/or services.
Supplier/Subcontractor +A business entity which provides the company with goods and/or services integral to, and utilized in/for, the production of the company's goods and/or services.
Sustainability +The subject of a social and/or management The subject of a social and/or management science that focuses on the impacts of human activities on the carrying capacities of vital capitals in the world, relative to levels of such capitals required to ensure human well-being -- includes consideration of non-human well-being, as well. deration of non-human well-being, as well.
Sustainability Context +Requirements for human impacts on vital ca Requirements for human impacts on vital capitals, adherence to which must be achieved and/or maintained in order for human activity to be sustainable. Grounded in norms, standards or thresholds for levels of vital capitals required to ensure human (or stakeholder) well-being. ensure human (or stakeholder) well-being.
Sustainability Footprints +See http://murninghanpost.com/2011/03/10/stepping-toward-corporate-sustainability-footprinting/
Sustainability Performance +A measure of the degree to which the impac A measure of the degree to which the impacts of human activity on vital capitals are consistent with related norms, standards or thresholds for what such impacts must, or ought to, be in order to ensure human (or stakeholder) well-being -- includes consideration of non-human well-being. des consideration of non-human well-being.
Sustainable +A description of human activity indicating A description of human activity indicating that the impacts of such activity on vital capitals are consistent with related norms, standards or thresholds for what such impacts ought to be in order to ensure human well-being -- includes consideration of non-human well-being, as well. deration of non-human well-being, as well.
Sustainable Mobility +Transportation infrastructure and services Transportation infrastructure and services that operate within the earth's carrying capacity. "Current mobility trends are unsustainable, which means that the growing worldwide demand for transportation cannot be met simply by expanding today’s means of transportation." World Business Council for Sustainable Development siness Council for Sustainable Development
Sweet gas +Gas that contains little hydrogen sulfide.

U

Upcycle +The practice of using a disposable item an The practice of using a disposable item and transforming it into something of greater value. For example: using old PVC to make chairs, taking used canvas to make boots, or using typewriter keys to make cuff links. The term was coined by William McDonaugh and Michael Braugart in Cradle-to-Cradle. and Michael Braugart in Cradle-to-Cradle.

V

Vernacular strategies +The idea of relying on historical solution The idea of relying on historical solutions for designing architectural solutions that are environmentally sound. Example: the design of Adobe huts to accommodate dwellers in desert settings. Discussed during a broadcast of On Point with Tom Ashbrook, "Is High Heat the New Normal", on 22 July 2011. Referenced by guest Matt Fajkus, professor at U-Texas School of Architecture rofessor at U-Texas School of Architecture
Vital Capitals +Types of capital resources required for ba Types of capital resources required for basic human and/or non-human well-being, the absence of which can put such well-being at risk. In sustainability theory and practice, such capitals generally consist of natural or ecological capital, and anthro capital (i.e., human, social, and constructed capital). The combination of their respective stocks and flows are also sometimes referred to as their carrying capacities. referred to as their carrying capacities.

W

Wasted light +A generation ago nobody but astronomers he A generation ago nobody but astronomers heard the term “light pollution.’’ Now it’s known widely. Light pollution is the artificial glow that you see filling the night sky. It’s caused mostly by “waste light’’ spilling uselessly sideways and upward from poorly designed and improperly aimed outdoor light fixtures. Energy concerns have focused new attention on this waste light, which of course is wasted electricity. ht, which of course is wasted electricity.
Weak Sustainability +An orientation to sustainability performance that regards impacts on unlike forms of vital capitals as substitutable for, or interchangeable with, one another.
Weblining +The practice of denying people opportunities based on their digital selves. Similar to "red lining"--that is, by virtue of one's geographical placement, the denial of loans, jobs, access to other opportunities due to alleged high-risk.

Y

Young worker +Any worker over the age of a child as defined earlier and under the age of 18.
(previous 25) (next 25)
Personal tools